Fatayer bi Sabanekh: Lebanese Spinach Pies فطاير السبانخ

baked pies

When I lived in Boston, I used to buy Fatayer bi Sabanekh, (fa-TYE-year bee sa-BEN-ikh) Lebanese* spinach pies, at Bob’s Pita Droubi Bakery in Roslindale, MA. One bite of this pastry transported me to an ancient exotic place. I could taste lemon and something else: a tart, lemony spice I later discovered was sumac. I have only found this spice, made from ground berries, in Middle Eastern markets.

You can make these with the traditional Fatayer olive oil yeast dough or use pizza dough. If you want a vegan pastry, substitute water for the milk and omit the egg glaze.

You can make the spinach filling a day ahead.

*Also claimed by Syrian, Palestinian, Turkish, Somali, and Jordanian cuisine

Traditional Fatayer Dough: (works great with cheese or meat fillings as well)

1 envelope dry yeast (1 tsp yeast)

1 tsp sugar

1/4 cup warm water

3 cups flour

1 tsp salt

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

1 cup warm milk

proofing yeast

Dissolve the sugar in the warm water. Proof the yeast by gently stirring it in, then cover with a damp dish towel in a warm place for 15 minutes until it foams. Mix the flour and salt in a medium-large bowl. Make a hole in the middle and add the proofed yeast, olive oil, and warm milk. Mix with your hands until the dough is formed. Transfer to a floured pastry mat or board. If it is sticky, sprinkle more flour on top until you can easily knead it. Knead for several minutes until it is springy.

dough before rising dough after rising

Transfer to an oiled bowl and cover with a damp dish towel in a warm place until it doubles. Knead again to flatten out the air bubbles, pull off egg-sized chunks of dough, rolling into a ball. Roll out each ball into a circle on a floured surface, then fill with the sabanekh (spinach mixture). You can make the sabanekh while the dough is rising.

I also invented this cross-cultural recipe using the sour cream dough my mom used to make for Vatrushka, a Russian dumpling filled with farmer’s cheese. I filled it with the Sabanekh. I like how the rich dough compliments the spinach filling.

Sour Cream Dough
1/2  cube butter (1/4 cup) , softened to room temperature
1 1/2 Tb sour cream
1 large egg
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt

I’ve used both an electric mixer and a food processor to make the dough. Beat butter until light and fluffy.  Add sour cream and egg and beat well. Add flour and salt and mix until dough is formed. Knead about 12 times on a floured board until it is not sticky. Roll dough into a ball and cover in plastic wrap. Place in refrigerator for ½ an hour. You can begin to prepare the filling while the dough is chilling.

Sabanekh: Spinach filling

1 Tb olive oil
1 onion
1 bunch fresh spinach, or 10 oz pkg leaves, washed well and dried in a salad spinner
½ tsp salt
1 Tb lemon juice
1 tsp sumac
3 Tb pine nuts

Heat olive oil in a heavy skillet. Chop onion finely with the blade in a food processor, and then add to oil. Cook on medium low about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent.

While onion is cooking, pulse spinach in batches in food processor until finely chopped.

Transfer the cooked onion to a medium bowl. Sprinkle the spinach with salt, and cook in the same pan for 2-3 minutes. The salt will help to draw the water from the spinach. can tower Let spinach cool, then place in a sieve over a bowl for 20 minutes to drain the excess liquid from the spinach. Press the bottom of a small bowl into the spinach in the sieve, then pile as many cans in the bowl as you can safely make into a tower. You will get about 2/3 cup of spinach water. You can use this in soups. While spinach is draining, roll out the fatayer dough into a circle shape. It won’t matter if the circle’s not perfect as long as you can fold it into a tricorner shape. If you use the sour cream dough, cut it with a round biscuit cutter. You can make larger pies by cutting with a top of a soup bowl.

Stir drained spinach into the onions. Stir in pine nuts, lemon juice, and sumac.

spinach on pastryFill pies with a tablespoonful of Sabanekh for small pies, more for larger pies. Flatten the filling  a bit with the back of the spoon, then fold in a tricorner shape: Gather two sides together and pinch the sides towards the middle. Fold in the opposite side towards the middle, pinching the other two edges towards the center. Pinch all sides towards the center. I leave a little space in the center so you can see the spinach filling. Brush with beaten egg if you like. Place on a cookie sheet sprayed with olive oil spray.

For Fatayer Dough: Bake for 15 minutes at 400◦

For Sour Cream Dough: Bake for 20 minutes at 350◦ until the dough is golden.

Brush with a bit of olive oil when you remove it from the oven. Let cool on a rack until you are able to eat them.

Tinga de Pollo: Spicy Stewed Chicken for tostadas or tacos



It’s Sept 16 – the 200th anniversary of Padre Hidalgo’s Grito de Dolores “¡Viva Mexico!”

To celebrate I’m making a big pot of  Frijoles pintos (Mexican pinto beans)

and serving it with Chicken Tostadas

Add tinga de pollo to  tortilla soup to give it extra flavor.

In my tostada recipe I specified leftover chicken, but today there are no leftovers, so I’m making the chicken from scratch. This is a pretty easy recipe. Tinga de Pollo means spicy stewed chicken. I marinade it first for added tenderness and flavor, then stew it in the marinade.The marinade uses the green and red colors of the Mexican flag.

If you cook it and leave it in the sauce overnight, it is even better since the flavors have developed and soaked into the chicken.

Tacos are excellent served with cilantro, lettuce, fresh tomatoes, and avocado in a fresh tortilla that is bent and heated on a comal until it holds it shape.

Makes enough chicken for 10 tacos or tostadas

3 chicken breast halves, trimmed of fat and chopped

juice of 1 lime

1 cup cilantro

¼ tsp olive oil

1 tsp cumin

1 tsp chipotle powder

1 tsp salt

7-oz can salsa (I use Herdez salsa ranchera)

1 cup diced tomatoes with green chile (use fresh Roma tomatoes and a jalapeño OR a can of diced tomatoes with green chile)

Mix all ingredients and let marinate for several hours.

Add 1/4 cup water. Cook chicken in marinade in a skillet until chicken is cooked through, about 10 minutes. Discard cooked cilantro. Serve in tacos or tostadas.I also tried this recipe without cutting up the chicken, just marinating it for several hours with slits cut in the breast, then barbecuing it. It came out juicy and spicy flavorful! Even better, I briefly stewed shredded leftover barbecued chicken in the marinade and made tacos de tinga de pollo asada from them.


Agua de Sandia (Watermelon cooler)

This refreshing Mexican drink is a perfect accompaniment to your summer barbecue or Mexican food. I don’t make it too sweet. If the watermelon is sweet, I don’t add any sweetener, otherwise I add only couple of spoonfuls of agave nectar, which is a natural low-glycemic sweetener.  Sweeten according to your taste and the sweetness of the watermelon.

Ingredients:

seedless watermelon

agave syrup (can substitute sugar, honey or non-caloric sweetener)

Ice and water

Cut up watermelon in slices, then wedges. Remove from peel. Cut into pieces and fill blender. Add 2 tsp. agave nectar syrup for each quart.

add agave syrup

Add 1 cup water and blend. Add 1 cup ice to cool and blend again. Adjust sweetener if needed. Repeat the process for as much agua de sandia you want to make.