Coconut Pancakes

coconut pancakes
These tender, delicious pancakes are made with coconut milk, shredded coconut and coconut oil. If you can find coconut sugar, you can use it to sweeten them.
Coconut oil is all the rage, and my son Francisco talked me into buying some. Now he says “Sounds like you’re going kookoo for coco!” While I wouldn’t fry eggs it in, (I tried – weird), it’s excellent in pancakes. Because it has a high smoke point, you can fry your pancakes in coconut oil without it burning the way butter does. To retain the coconut flavor and have the pancakes golden brown, cook them on medium heat.

Makes approximately 10 medium pancakes

coconut pancake ingredients

Ingredients:
2 eggs, well beaten
1 cup canned coconut milk (use low fat coconut milk to cut calories)
¾ cup finely ground whole wheat flour (aka white whole wheat flour)
1 Tb baking powder
¼ tsp salt
1 tsp sugar or coconut sugar
¼ cup unsweetened shredded coconut
2 Tb coconut oil

Beat coconut milk with eggs. Sift in flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Mix with wooden spoon just until dry ingredients are incorporated. Stir in shredded coconut.
Heat coconut oil in heavy skillet over medium heat, just until melted. Stir oil into the batter. Pour large spoonfuls of batter onto skillet. Turn when bubbles begin to form and edges begin to dry. Add a little bit of coconut oil before frying each batch.

Serve with fresh fruit, a tad of maple syrup and a bit of coconut oil if you like.

Lemon Ricotta-Cornmeal Pancakes

Inspired by a similar pancake I ate at the organic restaurant Gather in Berkeley, I invented this recipe. I loved the lemon ricotta cream with the grated Meyer lemon. It is sublime mixed with apricot jam and fresh peaches. Flax seed meal amps up the nutrition level.

Combine milk with lemon juice first, and let it sit while you mix the other ingredients. The lemon juice will curdle the milk so it resembles buttermilk.

Makes about 15 medium-sized pancakes

Mix milk and lemon juice:

2  2/3 cups milk (I use 1%)

1 tsp Meyer lemon juice

Mix other wet ingredients:

¾ cup low-fat ricotta cheese

2 large eggs

½ tsp grated rind of Meyer lemon

2 tsp vegetable oil

2 tsp melted butter

Mix dry ingredients:

1 cup cornmeal

1 1/4  cup whole wheat pastry or finely ground flour. If you can’t find this, use 3/4 cup whole wheat flour and 1/2 cup all-purpose white flour

1/4 cup ground flax seed

2 tsp baking powder

½ tsp baking soda

1/8 tsp salt

2 Tb sugar

Stir in:

½ cup sliced blueberries

1/2 cup pecan pieces

Directions:

Combine wet ingredients, mixing well.

Alternate 1/2 of milk mixture and dry ingredients, stirring only until lumps disappear. Fold in blueberries and nuts if desired.

Heat oiled skillet or pancake grill. Rub a cube of butter over surface. Fry pancakes over low-medium heat.

Lemon-ricotta cream:

1/3 cup ricotta cheese

½ tsp lemon juice from Meyer lemon

½ tsp grated Meyer lemon rind

1 tsp sugar

Whip ingredients together for about 2 minutes. Serve over pancakes with fresh strawberries and peaches. Top with apricot jam or maple syrup if desired.

Hanukkah Latkes (potato pancakes)

On Hanukkah, Jews light a menorah for 8 nights and eat foods fried in oil to celebrate the miracle of the oil in the holy lamp lasting for 8 days. Some eat doughnuts, but I prefer latkes, fried potato pancakes. This is my mother’s recipe, but I added the onion on my friend Vivian’s suggestion.

Serves 4

4 cups raw grated Russet potatoes. Use 4 large or 5 medium

1 onion, grated

4 large eggs

2 Tb matzo meal

1 tsp salt

2 1/2 cups canola oil per frying pan

Peel potatoes and soak in water until ready to grate. Grate by hand or in a food processor. Place in a colander so that potatoes can drain their water, until rest of ingredients are mixed and oil is hot. Pour oil into a heavy frying pan, such as cast iron and put on medium high heat. Beat eggs well and add matzo meal, onion and salt. Add potatoes and stir well.

Using a large slotted serving spoon and a large solid serving spoon, mold a spoonful of batter on the slotted spoon, squeezing down with the solid spoon. You will need to squeeze more water out of the potatoes toward the end of the frying. Gently place the latke in the hot oil.

Fry until golden brown, then flip over using the slotted spoon. Don’t crowd the pan, usually 3 or 4  latkes are good for a 9” pan. When latkes are golden brown on both sides, lift each one with the slotted spoon and let the oil drain back into the pan.

Place them on a rack over a cookie sheet. Put the rack in a low oven, about 275’. This will help the oil drain from the latkes and keep them warm and crispy until all the latkes are ready to serve.

Serve with applesauce. (Some people eat them with sour cream, but not in our family.)

Happy Hanukkah!