Pozole

Oy vey! Nice Jewish girl learns to cook with pork products! My friend Jann made this hearty and delicious pozole with her Mexican husband, Luciano, for their  New Years Eve parties. She gave me her recipe using pork shoulder, but the second time I made it I used the leaner pork loin.

Cooked with chilies and hominy and topped with cabbage, oregano, radishes and cilantro, it makes a rich and satisfying stew.

This recipe made 10 servings, including leftovers.

Ingredients:

1 gallon chicken broth. For the cross-cultural experience, use Roz’s Jewish Chicken Soup.
4 dried red chilies, such as ancho or pasilla chili
2 fresh poblano chili peppers
2 Tb olive oil
2 onions
2 1/2 pound pork loin.
1 Tb dried oregano
1 head garlic.
3 bay leaves
1 tsp cayenne
1 Tb paprika (Spanish smoked paprika adds a nice smoky flavor)
Several grinds black pepper
1 Tb salt to taste
2 chayotes, peeled, seed area removed, and chopped
39- oz and 15-oz cans of white or purple hominy (maíz blanco o morado)

Condiments:

1 Tb dried oregano
Black pepper
1 small onion, chopped fine
1 cup cilantro leaves
1 small green cabbage, shredded
A bunch of radishes, sliced thin
1 jalapeno, sliced thinly
4 limes, sliced into wedges
 

Bring the soup stock to boil in a large pot.

Heat a heavy frying pan and toast the dried red chilies and the poblano peppers. Place them in a covered bowl to cool, and then remove the stems and seed pods. Throw them in the stock pot

Pour a tablespoon of olive oil to the frying pan and cook the sliced onions until soft. Slice the poblano chiles and fry up with the onions, then add to the soup. Smash the garlic bulb with a molcajete or mortar and pestle, chop it finely and add it to the soup. Add bay leaves, salt, paprika, black pepper and cayenne.

Cut the pork into large (about 3 x 3) chunks and trim extra fat. Pour another tablespoon of oil to the frying pan and add the pork, sprinkling salt and dried oregano on each side. Brown pork on all sides then put in the stock. After pork is browned, add  2 ladles of hot broth to the frying pan to deglaze it. Using a metal spatula, loosen all the browned bits  into the broth and then pour it back into the pot.

Simmer the soup at low-medium heat for 1 ½ hours.

Pour the soup into a large container and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, remove the congealed fat from the top of the soup. Pour the broth through a sieve into a large pot, and heat it. Pour the solids into a bowl. Remove the red chili and strip whatever skin from it that you can. Put in a blender with 2 cups of broth and run blender on high, then add to the broth in the pot, rinsing the blender with broth several times to get all the chili out.

While broth is cooking, shred or chop the meat, discarding bones and fat, and then add the shredded meat to the broth. Add chopped chayotes and hominy. Adjust salt to taste. Simmer for 30 minutes, until chayote is tender, and then scoop into bowls.

Top with condiments, squeeze a bit of lime in, roll up a few warm corn tortillas to dip in the soup, y disfrútelo.

Minestrone Soup

Fall in the Bay Area brings a few weeks of sunshine to ripen tomatoes, then rainy and chilly days, perfect Minestrone Soup weather. Pick those ripened tomatoes off the withering vines, combine them with broth and chopped veggies and herbs in a big pot. This is a pretty forgiving recipe, so if you want to clean out the veggie bin of your fridge, throw in what you’ve got. You could use frozen veggies  or canned tomatoes. There is a use for everything, even Parmesan cheese rinds! The rind lends a wonderful flavor to the soup. If it doesn’t break up, leave it in the pot when serving.

10 servings:
1 or more Parmesan rinds
1 large onion, diced
3 stalks celery, diced
1 bunch red Swiss chard, leaves torn off ribs and chopped fine, to make about 3 ½ cups, dice the ribs
1 large red bell pepper, diced to make 1 cup
1 large green bell pepper, diced to make 1 cup
1/2 pound crimini mushrooms
1 Tb salt (to taste)
½  tsp fresh minced rosemary
1 Tb fresh minced oregano
1 tsp dried basil
6 cloves garlic, minced
several grinds black pepper
One package (4 links) Aidells chicken sausages. either artichoke and garlic or sun-dried tomato with mozzarella cheese (optional)
1 bay leaf
several shakes red pepper flakes
10 cups (2 1/2 quarts) homemade chicken or vegetable stock Roz’s Jewish Chicken Soup or vegetable broth (you can use boxed stock, but it won’t be as good!)
1 can tomato paste
4 cups diced tomatoes (Roma is best)
OR 28 ounce can San Marzano peeled tomatoes to sub for tomatoes and tomato paste
4 dried Porcini mushrooms
1 rind Parmesan cheese
1  cup peeled and diced carrots (2 large carrots)
2 peeled and diced red potatoes
2/3 cup small pasta (I used the tiny tubes called ditalini for my last batch, but I have also used salad macaroni)
4 small zucchini, diced to make 1 ½ cups
1/2 pound green beans, chopped
1 15-oz can kidney beans, drained and rinsed.
1 cup frozen or fresh corn kernels
1/2 cup frozen or fresh peas
1 small bunch Italian parsley, chopped.
1 Tb fresh minced basil (about 5 leaves)
 
Garnish:
a few pinches dried oregano to taste
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese

 

Heat stock, Parmesan rinds, tomato paste, tomatoes or canned tomatoes  in a large pot.

Grind dried Porcini mushrooms in a coffee grinder or small food processor and add to the stock. Add salt to taste.

Scrub mushrooms and rinse well. Dry in paper towel. and cut off woody ends from the stems. Place mushrooms on toaster oven tray and spray with olive oil spray. Broil for 10 minutes. When they cool, cut them in quarters and add to stock.

Stir-fry onions, red bell pepper, chard ribs, garlic, celery, and herbs in  olive oil in a heavy skillet until translucent. Add to stock.

Slice sausages in quarters lengthwise and then into half-coins. Stir fry in the same skillet as the onions were in for about 4 minutes, until browned. Add to soup, then ladle some soup into the frying pan and scrape the browned bits into the soup, then pour back into the pot.

Stir in carrots, chard leaves, canned beans, and potato and cook 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Stir in pasta, green beans, zucchini, parsley, corn and peas. Cook 10 minutes on medium. Stir in fresh basil.

Discard bay leaf and ladle into bowl. Stir in a pinch of dried oregano, fresh basil, and a few spoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese. Enjoy with a slice of good bread such as Acme herb slab, foccacia, olive bread, or sourdough baguette. Manga!

Chicken soupy rice

Happy once, happy twice,
happy chicken soup with rice

I used to sing this Maurice Sendak poem* to my kids while making them chicken soup with rice, one of the all time great comfort foods. Lately we’ve been suffering from stomach flu, which precludes most of that fresh produce I’m usually serving. Instead I made a soupy rice with a squeeze of lemon. It’s a simple dish that can be made in the rice cooker while napping.

Ingredients:

1 cup white rice (I used long grain)

5 cups homemade chicken broth: Roz’s Jewish Chicken Soup (plus a vegan version)

1 tsp lemon juice

Cook rice with 3 cups broth in rice cooker, then stir in two more cup broth when cooker is done. Let sit 1/2 hour, then turn on cooker again until rice is heated through. You can also cook rice with 5 cups broth over the stove until rice softens (about 20 minutes.) Let sit so that rice soaks up more broth, about ½ an hour. It should be soupier than regular rice.  Serve with a tsp of lemon stirred in.

If you are not up for making homemade stock and have a box of  broth on hand, you can make this recipe using 2/3 cup rice to 3 cups broth in the rice cooker, then add the last cup after the cooker goes off. It won’t be as amazing as the homemade broth version, but it is easier.

Vegetarians and Vegans can make this recipe with vegetable stock.

* To see the entire poem, from “Chicken Soup with Rice, A Book of Months” by Maurice Sendak, as sung by Carole King, click here.

Roz’s Jewish Chicken Soup (plus a vegan version)

OK the chicken doesn’t need to be Jewish. But this soup will cure any cold, which is why it’s called Jewish penicillin.

My Vietnamese student Dan gave me a the advice to break the bones to expose the marrow to add amazing flavor and nutrients to the broth.

Ingredients:

2 Tb chicken fat (Schmaltz) skimmed from chicken drippings

3 stalks celery, leaves also, chopped

1 large carrot chopped, or a handful of baby carrots

1 onion, coarsely chopped with skin

1 leek, coarsely chopped

3 cloves garlic, chopped

1 tsp dried thyme

1 tsp dried oregano

1 sprig fresh rosemary

1 Tb salt, or to taste

1 quart (4 quarts) plus 1 gallon (16 cups) water

Bones, skin, herbs and vegetables from roasted chicken

A handful of parsley

1 bay leaf

1 tsp black peppercorns

Directions: Roast chicken using my recipe for

Roast Chicken

You can also use a rotisserie chicken.

bones

After serving and boning chicken, reserve bones and skin and herbs. Break the bones to expose the marrow (I use kitchen shears). I include the dark meat we didn’t have for dinner. Refrigerate overnight in a container.

Fill the roasting pan with about a quart (4 cups) of water and bring to a boil. Squeeze the lemon that you cooked in the chicken into the pan, then discard the lemon, since the pith will give a bitter flavor to your broth. Simmer pan for 15 minutes, then turn off the burner and let sit for half an hour. Scrape the drippings from the pan using a metal spatula until they are incorporated into the liquid. Pour into a container and refrigerate overnight.

If I’m not up for making stock the next day, I freeze the bones and drippings until I am ready. Sometimes I will have 2 or 3 frozen carcasses until I’m ready to tackle the soup. If you do this, double the seasonings and add an extra gallon of water to your stock.

IMG_0042

The next day, skim the fat (schmaltz) from the refrigerated pan drippings to make two Tb fat. Discard the rest of the fat (unless you are planning to use it for matzo balls).

IMG_1019

Melt the fat in a large pot.Saute the chopped vegetables until they are soft, and stir in the herbs.

stock cooking in pot

Add the defatted drippings, along with 1 gallon (16 cups) water, and bring it to a boil. Add the parsley, bay leaf, peppercorns, chicken bones and skin to the soup and return to a boil. Simmer for at least an hour and half.

Let cool until you can handle the pan. Strain through a strainer into a container or two, discarding all solids.

container in ice bath

Rinse out soup pot and fill with ice and cold water. Place soup container(s) in the ice bath until cold, then store in refrigerator. This is to safeguard your broth from bacteria growing in lukewarm soup.

The next day you can skim some of the fat off with a slotted spoon (keep a couple of tablespoons for flavor though), and adjust seasonings. This broth can be used as a base for various soups. Serve topped with fresh or dried dill.

  • Add kneydlekh (matzo balls) for special occasions like Passover and Rosh Hashanah or just to help the healing process.

matzo balls in chicken soup

  •  Saute chopped carrots, celery, sugar snap peas or frozen peas in a teaspoon of chicken fat, add hot broth, sliced roasted chicken, and either cooked rice or egg noodles. Sing, “Sippin’ once, Sippin’ twice, Sippin’ chicken soup with rice” along with Carole King and Maurice Sendek: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSJ0FDplzjk

chicken rice soup

Mexican fideo soup: My mother-in-law, the beautiful Conchita, immigrated from Mexico to the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas with a flair for making meals that were bién rica.  I have adapted some of her  recipes such as sopa de fideo, which is Mexican chicken-noodle soup.  She fries the fideo, which is short vermicelli, and adds onions, tomatoes and salsa.

Vegan Version: Omit the chicken. Saute vegetables in olive oil instead of shmaltz and add herbs.  Boil the vegetables and herbs for an hour, then strain and use as a base for vegetable soups.

Tortilla Soup, bién rica

This classic Mexican soup is fragrant with lime, comino and oregano, with just enough heat from chile powder. This is one of the first recipes that I posted on my blog. I’ve updated it to the way it has evolved in the last 10 years.

You could make a vegan version of this recipe by using vegetable broth.

I make my own Tortillas de maíz hechas a mano – Homemade corn tortillas from fresh masa from the local Mexican market or with dry masa. They will literally melt into the soup. When I’m not up to that I buy preservative-free tortillas made in East Oakland: (from La Finca or La Mexicana)  in Mexican markets in the East Bay,  or at La Palma in San Francisco.

You can roast the tomatoes ahead of time and make tinga de pollo or season the chicken ahead of time.

Serves 3 for dinner with a warm tortilla in the soup.

1 ½ quarts (6 cups) homemade chicken bone broth.  See   (ok, buy it boxed or canned  it you don’t have homemade.)

1 corn tortilla (homemade is best) for the soup, plus 3 tortillas to serve in the soup.

14 oz can roasted tomatoes or 5 fresh Roma tomatoes and olive oil spray

2 Tb olive oil, divided

1/2 onion plus 2 Tb onion for chicken and 2 Tb for garnish

3 cloves garlic

2 large stalks celery, chopped

1 large carrot, peeled and chopped

1 tsp. cumin (comino in Spanish) divided between chicken and soup

2 tsp dried oregano, divided between chicken and soup

1/2 to 1 tsp ancho chile powder (to taste) Remember a little goes a long way!

1/2 teaspoon salt to taste

½ roasted chicken breast shredded (tinga de pollo is an excellent addition and will add extra flavor)

2-3 teaspoons salsa

1 lime, juiced

Garnish with any of the above:

Several sprigs of fresh cilantro for each bowl if desired

2 – 3 tsp dried oregano

A tablespoon of minced raw onion for each bowl

1-2 Tb Monterey Jack cheese for each bowl

1 small to medium avocado sliced

If roasting your own tomatoes: Preheat oven to 300′ Halve tomatoes and place cut side up on a foil-lined pan. Spray with olive oil spray and bake for 1 hour. Remove the stems and skins from tomatoes and onion, then pulse them in a food processor. You can do this step ahead of time.

Heat 1 Tb olive oil in a large pot. add onions, celery and carrots and saute until onions soften. Add broth and bring to boil, then stir in tomatoes, cumin, chili powder and salt to taste.

Shred chicken breast. If not using tinga de pollo, prepare the chicken as follows: In a separate pan, heat 1 Tb olive oil and add onions and saute until soft. Add chicken and mix in 1 teaspoon oregano, 1/2 teaspoon comino and 2 Tb salsa. (You can do this part ahead of time.)

Heat tortilla on a comal or heavy frying pan until soft. You can alternatively microwave it for 30 seconds.

Ladle 2 cups of broth into a blender (try not to include the vegetables). Tear up the tortilla and add it to the blender. Blend on high until tortilla has crumbled into the broth. Pour back into the soup pot and mix thoroughly.

Stir in the cooked breast. Heat soup to hot. Juice the lime into the soup.

Pour soup into bowls. Roll a freshly warmed tortilla and put it in the bowl. Add avocado slices, sprinkle dried oregano, raw chopped onions, and cilantro as desired. Crumble cheese on top. ¡Disfrùtela!

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