Huevos Rancheros

Hevos Rancheros with frijoles

Huevos Rancheros con frijoles pintos is my favorite hearty Mexican breakfast. I like to make a batch of beans the night before and let them slowly cook in the crock pot overnight. Then I pour them over the huevos rancheros and sprinkle them with salty cotija cheese or queso fresco (fresh cheese).

tortillas on comalIngredients: (serves one)

2 corn tortillas

nonstick canola oil spray

2 tsp butter

2 eggs

2 Tb warm salsa

2 teaspoons cotija cheese or queso fresco

about 1/4 cup frijoles pintos

Directions

Warm eggs in warm water for about 5 minutes.

Heat the comal. Spray comal and both sides of the tortillas with nonstick spray and heat over medium.

fried eggsMelt butter in a nonstick skillet. Fry the eggs. When the whites begin to harden, divide the eggs so the whites are not touching.

Pour salsa on eggsWhen tortillas begin to crisp, transfer them to a plate. Carefully place the eggs on top of them, Pour heated salsa over the eggs.

eggs-with-salsa-and-cheese.jpg

Sprinkle with half the cheese (about one teaspoon).

Hevos Rancheros with frijolesLadle beans over eggs and on the side if you wish. Sprinkle the rest of the cheese on the beans. Disfrutalo!

 

 

 

Tortillas de maíz hechas a mano – Homemade corn tortillas

Today I am posting my 100th blog entry! I wanted to make it special. I am posting my handmade tortillas because one of my first recipes was I’ve perfected this soup by popping torn quesadillas made with Monterey jack cheese on homemade tortillas into the broth.

I am fortunate to work in the Fruitvale section of East Oakland, near La Finca tortilleria which sells both their own tortillas and the fresh masa (dough). I’ve bought their tortillas for years, because I love to take home a warm package and because they are preservative-free. I recently dug out my tortilla press and began making my own tortillas from their fresh masa. This is stone-ground nixtamal, corn soaked in a lime mixture. Much better than the dry masa harina you mix with water, because the tortillas stay fresh longer.

The trick was to make the tortillas not stick to the pan or come out misshapen. The key is to have the comal hot enough and to handle the tortilla carefully so it doesn’t bunch up. My friend and colleague Maria  helped me perfect my tortillas and showed me how to make them puffy by pressing on them lightly after turning.

Here’s the drill: Heat a comal or heavy frying pan. Spread a long piece of plastic wrap over the inside of the tortilla press. Roll a golf-ball size piece of masa into a ball and place it in the middle of the bottom press.

Flatten it a little bit with your hand, then close the press and press the handle down. Don’t press so hard that the tortilla is too thin and squishes out beyond the edges. When you open the press, the masa should make a perfect circle.

Carefully peel one piece of the plastic off the tortilla. Holding the loose plastic over your hand, flip the tortilla on your hand.

Then carefully pull off the other side of the plastic. Flip the tortilla back on  your bare hand.

Slide the tortilla on the hot comal so that it lies flat on the comal. I usually can fit about 3 tortillas on my comal.

Heat the tortilla until the sides begin to dry out and start to curl up slightly. (Don’t turn them too soon or they will crumple and stick.)

You should be able to flip them with your hand, although you can use a spatula if you wish. If the comal is hot enough, they won’t stick. Heat the other side for half as long. Both sides should be lightly toasted. Flip it one more time and press your fingertips on them several times.

This somehow makes them puff up, which looks really cool.

Tonight we had tacos de Tinga de Pollo with homemade tortillas.

I love quesadillas with grated or sliced cheese on the puffy tortillas.

Fish Tacos without grease – Tacos de Pescado sin grasa

???????????????????????????????I first tasted Baja-style fish tacos in a fast food place by the beach in Los Angeles. I thought they were the most wonderful thing! But I needed to find a less greasy alternative.

I make a lighter version (361.5 calories for 2 tacos) of those fried fish tacos, using Barbecued Salmon or Poached Salmon. Substitute lime for lemon in the recipe.

Or try my spicy pan-fried rock cod or salmon with Tajín (chili powder with lime and salt) in the recipe below.

Salmon is rich in omega-3, the healthy fat.

I add lots of fresh vegetables and heat the tortillas on a comal until stiff enough to hold a taco shape. Top with lime juice, salsa and avocado chunks or  Sonia’s guacamole.

Pan Fried Fish Tacos Serves 3 hungry people

Crunchy yet still not as greasy as deep-fried fish tacos, I made these with dry masa harina (corn flour) that I used for making tamales. It’s not as coarse as cornmeal, but not as fine as tortilla masa. If you don’t have masa, substitute 1/2 all-purpose flour and 1/2 cornmeal.

2 large fillets (1  1/2 pounds) of rock cod (red snapper) or salmon. Tail pieces of fish are best as they contain few if any bones

2 Tb canola oil

1/2 cup masa para tamales (or 1/4 cup each flour and corn meal)

1  tsp salt

several grinds black pepper

1 tsp Tajín (tah -Heen) (chili powder with lime and salt)

1/2 cup milk (I use 1% fat)

juice of one lime

Wash fillets well and dip in milk.

Combine masa, Tajín, salt and pepper on a plate.

Shake excess milk off fish and roll it in the masa.

Heat oil until hot. Place fish in oil and cook over medium heat about 5 minutes, until it browns. Turn over and cook until golden brown on the other side.

Sprinkle with lime juice. Serve with vegetable slaw as below.

Taco Ingredients: Makes 6 tacos

6 corn tortillas

½ lb cooked salmon fillet, skin removed.

Veggies:

1 cup finely chopped or shredded cabbage

1 red bell pepper, diced

¼ cup cilantro leaves

1 large radish, sliced or chopped

½  cob of cooked corn (boiled or roasted), stripped (You can substitute defrosted frozen corn)

juice of 1 lime, plus another lime to squeeze on tacos

salsa to taste

salt to taste

avocado chunks or Sonia’s guacamole to taste

Mix chopped vegetables together, adding a bit of salt and lime juice.

Flake the salmon and squeeze lime juice on it.

Heat tortillas on comal or heavy frying pan until pliable, then fold in half. Heat until they hold their shape but are not so crispy as to break when you open them.

Fill with salmon and cabbage slaw. Top with guacamole, lime juice and salsa.

This recipe can also be viewed at

http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/cookbooks.asp?cookbook=288991

Nutrition Facts
3 Servings 
Amount Per Serving
Calories 361.5
Total Fat 17.6 g
Saturated Fat 2.4 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3.8 g
Monounsaturated Fat 9.0 g
Cholesterol 36.4 mg
Sodium 185.1 mg
Potassium 1,069.8 mg
Total Carbohydrate 40.2 g
Dietary Fiber 11.4 g
Sugars 3.5 g
Protein 18.8 g
Vitamin A 18.0 %
Vitamin B-12 26.1 %
Vitamin B-6 49.1 %
Vitamin C 162.0 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 11.7 %
Calcium 8.5 %
Copper 24.0 %
Folate 31.0 %
Iron 14.6 %
Magnesium 16.4 %
Manganese 15.0 %
Niacin 39.9 %
Pantothenic Acid 27.3 %
Phosphorus 23.2 %
Riboflavin 27.1 %
Selenium 35.9 %
Thiamin 22.7 %
Zinc 9.4 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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Enchiladas Verdes

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When tangy tomatillos ripen at the end of summer, I get a hankering for Enchiladas Verdes (green enchiladas) . I used to think that tomatillos were little green tomatoes, but I found out they are actually not tomatoes at all, but related to the gooseberry. The ancient Aztecs grew them and gave them the name miltomatl. Best eaten when green, they come wrapped in a papery husk, which must be removed before cooking. They are high in pectin, which helps thicken sauces. Roasting the tomatillos, chilies and garlic enhances their flavor.

Makes 8 enchiladas

Salsa Verde

10 large tomatillos (about ½ pound), husks removed

1 ½ small spring onions or 1 small white onion, peeled

3 large garlic cloves, peeled

2 poblano chilies

2 jalapeño peppers and 4 Serrano chili peppers (This will make a spicy sauce. Use less chilies if you want a milder sauce)

1 ½ tea. salt (to taste)

juice of one lime

1 cup cilantro leaves, plus a few for garnish.

1/3 cup pepitas (green pumpkin seeds)

1 tea. minced fresh oregano leaves (or ½ tea. dried oregano)

1 to 1 1/2 cups chicken broth Roz’s Jewish Chicken Soup

Enchiladas

8 corn tortillas

3 cups shredded cooked chicken breast (1 large whole breast). See Roast Chicken

OR one pound ground turkey

½ cup reduced fat shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Olive oil cooking spray

You can make the sauce and filling ahead of time, then assemble and heat right before serving.

Preheat oven to 425’ Spray a baking pan with non-stick olive oil spray. Place tomatillos, chilies, garlic, and onion on baking pan.

Bake for 10 minutes, remove garlic and tomatillos, and flip other vegetables. Bake 10 minutes more, until chilies are charred and soft and onions begin to brown. Remove from oven and let cool in a bowl or container. You can do this part a day ahead and pop the container in the fridge.

Toast pepitas on a comal or heavy frying pan over medium heat until they begin to pop. Let them cool, then grind them in a clean coffee grinder or spice grinder. If you don’t have a grinder, you can run them in a food processor. Reserve a few whole pepitas for garnish.

Remove stems and seed pod from chilies. Keep some seeds in for extra spicyness.

removing seeds from chilies

Remove stems from tomatillos over container or blender container since they will make a mess. Add roasted vegetables and liquid from them, ground pepitas, lime juice, oregano, cilantro, salt and 1 cup chicken soup and blend until smooth.

Bring sauce to boil in a saucepan. Boil for 5 minutes, then let simmer for 15 minutes until the sauce is thick and coats the spoon. If it is too thick, add up to 1/2 cup more broth.

While sauce is cooking, shred the chicken breast. Stir in about 1 1/4 cups of sauce to the chicken breast and reserve the rest. Heat sauce and chicken in the saucepan over medium heat until the sauce permeates the chicken, about 10 minutes. Let it cool until you can handle it. Again, you can do this part ahead of time.

chicken for enchiladas verdes

You can also make this dish using ground turkey. Brown one lb turkey and drain fat. Add 1/2 cup sauce to turkey and let it cook 5 minutes until sauce permeates it.

Assembling the enchiladas: preheat oven to 350’

Traditionally tortillas are dipped in hot oil before coating with enchilada sauce. I use olive oil spray to cut down on the fat. I only bake with some of the sauce, so the enchiladas won’t get soggy. I pour heated sauce on the enchiladas just before serving.

Pour half the warm sauce into a shallow bowl. Lightly spray each tortilla with olive oil spray before heating briefly on the comal or heavy frying pan. When tortilla is hot and soft, dip it into the sauce so that it coats the tortilla on both sides.

Place tortilla on a plate and place a few tablespoons of the chicken or turkey inside the tortilla

then roll it up.

Place seam side down on a baking pan sprayed with olive oil cooking spray. Continue with all tortillas. Spoon the sauce that’s left in the bowl over the enchiladas (about ¼ cup).

Bake at 350’ for 10 minutes. Remove from oven and sprinkle grated cheese over enchiladas.

Put back in oven for 5 minutes so that cheese will melt.

Heat remaining sauce until hot. When you remove the enchiladas from the oven the second time, pour hot sauce on and around the enchiladas. Garnish with cilantro leaves and whole roasted pepitas.